Turning ideas into assets
 

Trading IPR - The different properties

From figure 1 you can tell to what extent IPR active businesses have traded in IPR within the area of the right in question. E.g. in 2010 more than 30% of the design active businesses traded their rights while a little more than 20% of the patent active businesses traded their patents in 2010.

patent, brugsmodeller, og designs
Figure 1: The proportion of Danish IPR active businesses that have traded with the rights in question, 2009 and 2010.



DESIGN

Differences between small and large businesses
As is the case among patent active businesses, it is also the large design active businesses that trade most frequently. Figure 2 shows that among the design active businesses with more than 100 employees 45% traded their designs in 2010.

design, opdelt på virksomhedsstr.
Figure 2: The proportion of Danish design active businesses that have traded with designs divided by business size broken down by number of employees, 2009 and 2010.



Differences between industries
Among IPR active businesses in general it is the businesses in knowledge intensive industries such as medical/health that trade most frequently. As shown in figure 3, is it typically businesses in industries such as furniture/clothing and building/construction that trade most frequently, when it comes to design active businesses.

design, fordelt brancher
Figure 3: The proportion of Danish design active businesses that have traded in design broken down by industries (Average for 2009 - 2010).


Buying, selling and licensing rights
Figure 4 shows that the most common type of trade among design active businesses is purchasing other's designs.

The figures should be interpreted with caution and is only a snapshot of a moving picture, as the number of Danish design active businesses is relatively low, and smaller changes in the number of traded designs can cause relatively large changes in the figures.

design, purchased, sold etc
Figure 4: The proportion of Danish design active businesses that have traded with design broken down by type of trade (Average for 2009 and 2010).



UTILITY MODELS
Differences between small and large businesses
Among businesses with utility models, it is also the large businesses that trade most frequently. On average for 2009 and 2010 just under 20% of the utility model active businesses with more than 100 employees traded with their rights.

brugsmodeller, virksomhedsstr.
Figure 5: The proportion of Danish businesses with utility models that have traded with utility models divided by business size broken down by number of employees (Average for 2009 and 2010).


Differences between industries
As figure 6 shows, it was particularly in the industries furniture/clothing and energy/environment that Danish businesses with utility models traded their models in 2009 and 2010.

brugsmodeller, brancheforeling
Figure 6: The proportion of Danish businesses with utility models that have traded in utility models broken down by industries (Average for 2009-2010).



Buying, selling and licensing rights 
Figure 7 shows that the most common type of trading utility models is in-licensing. The figures should be interpreted with caution and is only a snapshot of a moving picture, as the number of Danish businesses with utility models is relatively low, and smaller changes in the number of traded utility models can cause relatively large changes in the figures.

brugsmodeller, solgt, købt, ind-udlienseret
Figure 7: The proportion of Danish businesses with utility models that have traded in utility models broken down by type of trade (Average for 2009-2010).